Astronaut takes stunning pictures of the Southern Lights from the International Space Station

‘An aurora under the full moon, what could be better?’ Astronaut takes stunning pictures of the Southern Lights from the International Space Station

  • Astronaut and aerospace engineer Thomas Pesquet, 43, is presently on the International Space Station 
  • The French astronaut photographed the Aurora Australis with a uncommon bluish hue below the gentle of the moon   
  • ‘The moon was excessive and really shiny. It lit the clouds creating a really particular environment,’ Pesquet defined 

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These pictures are, unquestionably, out of this world.

French astronaut Thomas Pesquet has captured breathtaking photographs of the Southern Lights below the full moon from the International Space Station (ISS).

The aurora – which is often inexperienced tinged with purple or purple  – appeared to have a uncommon bluish hue, which solely happens below particular situations. 

Thomas Pesquet captured breathtaking images of the Southern Lights under the full moon from the International Space Station

Thomas Pesquet captured breathtaking photographs of the Southern Lights below the full moon from the International Space Station

The Aurora - which is typically green tinged with red or purple - appeared to have a rare bluish hue

The Aurora – which is often inexperienced tinged with purple or purple – appeared to have a uncommon bluish hue

Pesquet, 43, who’s an astronaut for the European Space Agency, defined in a Facebook post: ‘The moon was high and very bright, it lit the clouds creating a very special atmosphere… and it made this aurora polar… almost blue. 

‘Wonder what Mother Nature has in store for us for the rest: a yellow borealis or bright red? A huge rainbow?’

The aerospace engineer admitted he’d witnessed a number of auroras throughout his present mission – Alpha – which launched on April 23 of this 12 months. 

However, he confirmed this explicit view ‘came with something extra’ because of the moon’s glow.

Auroras occur when electrically charged sun particles enter the Earth's atmosphere and collide with oxygen and nitrogen particles

Auroras happen when electrically charged solar particles enter the Earth’s environment and collide with oxygen and nitrogen particles

‘The moon was high and very bright, it lit the clouds creating a very special atmosphere,' Pesquet said, describing the rare phenomenon

‘The moon was high and very bright, it lit the clouds creating a very special atmosphere,’ Pesquet said, describing the rare phenomenon 

WHAT ARE AURORAS? 

There are two types of auroras – Aurora Borealis, which means ‘dawn of the north’, and Aurora Australis, ‘dawn of the south’.

The lights are created when charged particles from the sun enter Earth’s atmosphere.

Usually the particles are deflected by the Earth’s magnetic field, but some enter the atmosphere and collide with gas particles. 

These collisions emit light in many colours, although pale green and pink are common. 

Pesquet added: ‘An aurora under the full moon, what could be better?’

Auroras happen when electrically charged solar particles enter the Earth’s environment and collide with oxygen and nitrogen particles.

The pure phenomenon happens at the north and south poles, that means individuals positioned in very excessive or very low latitudes have higher possibilities of observing one. 

Northern auroras – usually often called the ‘Northern Lights’ – are known as Aurora Borealis, which suggests ‘daybreak of the north’.

Southern Lights are known as Aurora Australis – from the Latin time period that means southern, which by the way, is how Australia obtained its identify.

The Aurora Australis is finest seen from Antarctica, Tasmania and the southern mainland shoreline.

This isn’t the first time Pesquet has delivered spellbinding pictures from the ISS. Earlier this 12 months, he shared stunning photographs of Uluru, Australia, from his perch in house. 

He is one of seven astronauts presently enterprise analysis in the house station, which is a $100 billion (£80billion) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 250 miles (400km) above Earth. 

‘An aurora under the full moon, what could be better?’ Pesquet wondered, after sharing the photographs from space

‘An aurora under the full moon, what could be better?’ Pesquet questioned, after sharing the pictures from house 

The ISS has been completely staffed by rotating crews of astronauts and cosmonauts since November 2000.

This is Pesquet’s second stint in the ISS.

In November 2016, he was launched into house for his six-month Proxima mission as a flight engineer for Expeditions 50 and 51. 

THE $100BN ISS SITS 250 MILES ABOVE THE EARTH 

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $100billion (£80billion) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 250 miles (400km) above Earth.

It has been completely staffed by rotating crews of astronauts and cosmonauts since November 2000. 

Research performed aboard the ISS usually requires a number of of the uncommon situations current in low Earth orbit, resembling low-gravity or oxygen.

ISS research have investigated house drugs, life sciences, bodily sciences, astronomy and meteorology.

The US house company, Nasa, spends about $3billion (£2.4billion) a 12 months on the house station program.

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